September 30, 2013 - It Rock And Roll
 

Day: September 30, 2013

GANew album from the veteran singer/songwriter. Fifty years into his storied career, Garland Jeffreys is enjoying the kind of creative second wind most artists can only hope for the first time around, earning a swarm of critical accolades and experiencing his most prolific stretch in decades. Truth Serum, his second album in two years, is a cri de coeur, a stripped-down tone poem from an artist taking his rightful and hard-earned place in the musical pantheon.

mp3 VBR~243 kbps | 72 MB | UL | TB | CL

phSaying Phosphorescent’s tribute album to Willie Nelson is redolent of history is an understatement — besides the subject of the album itself, the title acts as a specific reference to Nelson’s own 1975 tribute to Lefty Frizzell, To Lefty from Willie. There’s a danger of well-meaning overkill and clinging associations at work as a result, which the album has to struggle through. Still, it’s also an interesting sign of just how much certain goal posts in the world of indie rock have changed over time — the fascination with older, more “real” country has been present since the days of X and the Blasters, to name two bands out of many, and Nelson’s own well-established outsider/outlaw image is a perfect one to hang one’s hat on. Mathew Houck aka Phosphorescent and a crew of backing musicians aim to do just that on To Willie and if by default it can’t fully capture the killer resonance of Nelson’s immediately recognizable vocals and twang, Houck’s singing is far more hushed in comparison, though to his credit he doesn’t specifically aim to sound like Nelson in terms of out-and-out mimicry — the whole is still a game enough effort, if nothing else showing Houck’s excellent taste in song choices. (A collection of the Nelson performances of each track would make one heck of a mix disc.) Kicking off with a double-tip of the hat — “Reasons to Quit,” written by Merle Haggard rather than by Nelson but a standard for both men — To Willie generally maintains a steady, softly woozy late-night singalong feeling throughout its length, with some performances giving Houck and his band a real chance to shine instrumentally. “Walkin'” features the most musicians on a track — seven total, with some lovely pedal steel work by Ricky Ray Jackson — while Hank Cochran’s “Can I Sleep in Your Arms” is a full one-man-band effort. Another winner is “It’s Not Supposed to Be That Way,” with Houck and Angel Deradoorian sharing vocals over music that uses a spartan yet lovely guitar/bass arrangement.

mp3 192 kbps | 55 MB | UL

t
Columbia Nashville artist Tyler Farr has a lot of “crazy” to celebrate. In two career-firsts, his hit single, “Redneck Crazy” has officially been certified GOLD and just hit TOP 10 on the Country Mediabase chart, all before the launch of his debut album, Redneck Crazy.

 

mp3 VBR~247 kbps | 72 MB | UL | TB | CL

BSecond album by American progressive/jazz-rock group influenced by King Crimson, Magma, Cardiacs, Gentle Giant, Deerhoof, Tortoise, Etna, and Dunaj.

Tracks:

1. The Dumb Fish
2. Horse-Shaped Cloud
3. Miracle Pigeon
4. East is Fort Orthodox
5. Secret Crevice
6. Tragic Penguin
7. Catapult
8. Aviator Prosco
9. Abominable Pelican

mp3 320 kbps | 147 MB | UL | TB

joDon Juan’s Reckless Daughter is a 1977 double album by the folk/pop/rock musician Joni Mitchell. It is unusual for its experimental style, expanding even further on the jazz fusion sound of Mitchell’s Hejira from the year before. Mitchell has stated that, close to completing her contract with Asylum Records, she allowed this album to be looser than anything she’d done previously.
Don Juan’s Reckless Daughter is notable for being a pop record that attracted contributions from prominent jazz musicians, including two members of Weather Report- Jaco Pastorius, and Wayne Shorter, who would later become frequent collaborators of Mitchell’s.

mp3 320 kbps | 144 MB | UL | TB

TEDAs soon as the “play” button was hit, it seemed certain Springsteen had gone country. This album is hard to label. This is supposed to be a fusion of styles melted into rockabilly, but the label just doesn’t fit for the first six songs. The instrumentation is good throughout, a good, hard, driving beat on most of the songs (most of them written by Roddy). But the lyrics on that half dozen are throwaways. Roddy’s voice doesn’t grab, but on the last half of the album the mix of lyrics, voice, and music is much better. Two numbers (“Since I Lost You” and “Face The Night”) have a Bob Seger feel to them. ” I Was The One” and “Full Circle” get closer to country root. “New Bluebird” is a rocker with western swing overtones, and “Relaxin'” is a laid back piece with the same kind of musical (though not lyrical) feel of Fever. Not a “must buy”, but not a loser either.

mp3 VBR~245 kbps | 91 MB | UL | TB | CL

CHACharlie Parr is an American country blues musician, born in Austin, Minnesota, United States. He started his music career in Duluth, Minnesota. His influences include Charlie Patton, Bukka White, Reverend Gary Davis, Dave Van Ronk, and Mississippi John Hurt. He plays a National resonator guitar, a fretless open-back banjo, and a 12-string guitar in the Piedmont blues style. He is married (to Emily Parr, who occasionally adds back vocals to Charlie’s music) with two children.

mp3 192 kbps | 75 MB | UL

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