September 2013 - It Rock And Roll
 

Month: September 2013

GANew album from the veteran singer/songwriter. Fifty years into his storied career, Garland Jeffreys is enjoying the kind of creative second wind most artists can only hope for the first time around, earning a swarm of critical accolades and experiencing his most prolific stretch in decades. Truth Serum, his second album in two years, is a cri de coeur, a stripped-down tone poem from an artist taking his rightful and hard-earned place in the musical pantheon.

mp3 VBR~243 kbps | 72 MB | UL | TB | CL

phSaying Phosphorescent’s tribute album to Willie Nelson is redolent of history is an understatement — besides the subject of the album itself, the title acts as a specific reference to Nelson’s own 1975 tribute to Lefty Frizzell, To Lefty from Willie. There’s a danger of well-meaning overkill and clinging associations at work as a result, which the album has to struggle through. Still, it’s also an interesting sign of just how much certain goal posts in the world of indie rock have changed over time — the fascination with older, more “real” country has been present since the days of X and the Blasters, to name two bands out of many, and Nelson’s own well-established outsider/outlaw image is a perfect one to hang one’s hat on. Mathew Houck aka Phosphorescent and a crew of backing musicians aim to do just that on To Willie and if by default it can’t fully capture the killer resonance of Nelson’s immediately recognizable vocals and twang, Houck’s singing is far more hushed in comparison, though to his credit he doesn’t specifically aim to sound like Nelson in terms of out-and-out mimicry — the whole is still a game enough effort, if nothing else showing Houck’s excellent taste in song choices. (A collection of the Nelson performances of each track would make one heck of a mix disc.) Kicking off with a double-tip of the hat — “Reasons to Quit,” written by Merle Haggard rather than by Nelson but a standard for both men — To Willie generally maintains a steady, softly woozy late-night singalong feeling throughout its length, with some performances giving Houck and his band a real chance to shine instrumentally. “Walkin'” features the most musicians on a track — seven total, with some lovely pedal steel work by Ricky Ray Jackson — while Hank Cochran’s “Can I Sleep in Your Arms” is a full one-man-band effort. Another winner is “It’s Not Supposed to Be That Way,” with Houck and Angel Deradoorian sharing vocals over music that uses a spartan yet lovely guitar/bass arrangement.

mp3 192 kbps | 55 MB | UL

t
Columbia Nashville artist Tyler Farr has a lot of “crazy” to celebrate. In two career-firsts, his hit single, “Redneck Crazy” has officially been certified GOLD and just hit TOP 10 on the Country Mediabase chart, all before the launch of his debut album, Redneck Crazy.

 

mp3 VBR~247 kbps | 72 MB | UL | TB | CL

BSecond album by American progressive/jazz-rock group influenced by King Crimson, Magma, Cardiacs, Gentle Giant, Deerhoof, Tortoise, Etna, and Dunaj.

Tracks:

1. The Dumb Fish
2. Horse-Shaped Cloud
3. Miracle Pigeon
4. East is Fort Orthodox
5. Secret Crevice
6. Tragic Penguin
7. Catapult
8. Aviator Prosco
9. Abominable Pelican

mp3 320 kbps | 147 MB | UL | TB

joDon Juan’s Reckless Daughter is a 1977 double album by the folk/pop/rock musician Joni Mitchell. It is unusual for its experimental style, expanding even further on the jazz fusion sound of Mitchell’s Hejira from the year before. Mitchell has stated that, close to completing her contract with Asylum Records, she allowed this album to be looser than anything she’d done previously.
Don Juan’s Reckless Daughter is notable for being a pop record that attracted contributions from prominent jazz musicians, including two members of Weather Report- Jaco Pastorius, and Wayne Shorter, who would later become frequent collaborators of Mitchell’s.

mp3 320 kbps | 144 MB | UL | TB

TEDAs soon as the “play” button was hit, it seemed certain Springsteen had gone country. This album is hard to label. This is supposed to be a fusion of styles melted into rockabilly, but the label just doesn’t fit for the first six songs. The instrumentation is good throughout, a good, hard, driving beat on most of the songs (most of them written by Roddy). But the lyrics on that half dozen are throwaways. Roddy’s voice doesn’t grab, but on the last half of the album the mix of lyrics, voice, and music is much better. Two numbers (“Since I Lost You” and “Face The Night”) have a Bob Seger feel to them. ” I Was The One” and “Full Circle” get closer to country root. “New Bluebird” is a rocker with western swing overtones, and “Relaxin'” is a laid back piece with the same kind of musical (though not lyrical) feel of Fever. Not a “must buy”, but not a loser either.

mp3 VBR~245 kbps | 91 MB | UL | TB | CL

CHACharlie Parr is an American country blues musician, born in Austin, Minnesota, United States. He started his music career in Duluth, Minnesota. His influences include Charlie Patton, Bukka White, Reverend Gary Davis, Dave Van Ronk, and Mississippi John Hurt. He plays a National resonator guitar, a fretless open-back banjo, and a 12-string guitar in the Piedmont blues style. He is married (to Emily Parr, who occasionally adds back vocals to Charlie’s music) with two children.

mp3 192 kbps | 75 MB | UL

liLily Kershaw’s debut album, Midnight In The Garden, explores emotional landscapes and heart clutching melodies that say the unsaid things we struggle to say ourselves. The album takes root in the titans of folk music…those classic songsmiths who weave tapestries of sound with fingerpicking and tales of often unspoken truths.

m4a 256 kbps | 75 MB | UL | TB | CL

CLThe first ever solo album from the former Bakerloo,Colosseum and Humble Pie lead guitarist.Clem’s history also includes guest musician appearances with The Hamburg Blues Band,Jack Bruce,Billy Cobham and Dave Sancious,Roger Waters,Manfred Mann’s Earth Band,Jon Anderson,Chris de Burgh,BB King and Bob Dylan.Recorded in late 2012/early 2013 in Germany and the UK,here is a feast of classic guitar rock that will appeal to fans of well crafted,superbly performed and produced blues and hard rock.Good songs loaded with great guitar from this fine electric guitarist.The title of the album refers to the controversy surrounding the relationship between the media,celebrities and members of the general public,who often feel victimised by the sometimes ruthless attention of the press.Clem collaborated with legendary Cream lyricist Pete Brown on several of the original songs.Features guest performances by Chris Farlowe and Maggie Bell and keyboardist Ronnie Leahy.(Route 69 marks the reunion of Maggie and Ronnie,who began their careers together in the legendary Stone The Crows).Chris and Maggie also feature on a new version of I Don’t Need No Doctor,the Ray Charles classic that was such a massive hit at live performances during Clem’s time with Humble Pie.

mp3 320 kbps | 134 MB | UL | TB

AUI There may be no Honky in the title but Audrey Auld’s new album TONK has plenty in the content. Right from the outset, this latest release from the Nashville residing Aussie sets out to be a blueprint of how traditional country music can be made relevant in the 21st Century and Audrey succeeds in this mission. While it is unlikely to turn many heads in the Music Row establishment, those artists under their wing who have explored country roots in recent recordings could do no worse than look to TONK for inspiration and guidance of how to interpret the past.
Long since recording her first album back in Australia nearly a decade and a half ago, Audrey has made the US her home and while absorbing all the appropriate country sounds, still injects a striking antipodean accent into her songs to enhance their roots authenticity. Checking in at a rapid 41 minutes, the fourteen tracks of TONK spans the repertoire of traditional country served with a voice ranging from tear jerking sweetness to an earthy bitterness. The style is uncompromising and organic with a touch of humour added both lyrically and in the outtake nature to some of the songs.

mp3 320 kbps | 89 MB | UL | TB | CL

WIWillie Sugarcapps is a  supergroup comprised of Will Kimbrough, Grayson Capps, Sugarcane Jane (Savana Lee and Anthony Crawford), and Corky Hughes. Its members — most of whom live on or near the Gulf Coast of Alabama (only Kimbrough lives in Nashville, but is an Alabama native) — came together while performing a songwriter’s round at the Frog Pond gathering on Blue Moon Farm in Silverhill, Alabama. All five have deep attachments to organic music traditions of the Deep South in general, and the Gulf Coast in particular. They enlisted Grammy-winning producer / engineer (and Capps’ longtime partner) Trina Shoemaker, who also mixed the ten-song set. The album was cut in a single eight-hour session on the front porch of Sugarcane Jane’s house. Acoustic and electric guitars, mandolins, banjos, lap steel, hand percussion, kick drum, and whatever else was available were used in the moment — though minimal overdubs were added later. Country, bluegrass, blues, roots rock, gospel, and folk come together in this Southern Americana stew that reflects the rich musical culture of the Gulf Coast.

mp3 256 kbps | 83 MB | UL | CL | TB

letTracks:

1 – The Wood Brothers – Come and Get It
2 – Buddy Miller – Yellow Submarine
3 – Will Hoge – Band on the Run
4 – Jim Lauderdale – I’m Looking Through You
5 – Holly Williams – My Love
6 – Teddy Thompson – Let Me Roll It
7 – Bruce Cockburn – Fool on the Hill
8 – Ollabelle – Get Back
9 – Lee Ann Womack – Let ‘Em In
10 – Steve Earle – I Will
11 – Rodney Crowell – Every Night
12 – Matraca Berg – Yesterday
13 – Ketch Secor – Give Ireland Back to the Irish
14 – Sam Bush – I’ve Just Seen a Face
15 – Ed Snodderly – Uncle AlbertAdmiral Halsey
16 – The McCrary Sisters – Let It Be

mp3 320 kbps | 131 MB | UL | CL | TB

biBig Big Train have brought together the two English Electric CD’s as a double album called English Electric: Full Power, featuring four new tracks and a 96 page booklet which tells the stories behind the songs on the album. Big Big Train won the Breakthrough award at the Progressive Music Awards in 2013. Praise for Big Big Train: ‘the prog equivalent of the Olympics opening ceremony’ Geoff Barton, Classic Rock magazine ‘what we’re dealing with here is an act of rare, often indescribable brilliance’

mp3 320 kbps | 320 MB | UL | TB

tBrand new album, Story Music, on new label signing, Arlo & Betty Recordings, by the critically-acclaimed Faroese singer-songerwriter, Teitur.
With an ardent army of fans around the world, Albums Of The Week in both Guardian and Independent, two Danish “Grammies”, and numerous synchs in contemporary American movies and TV shows, Teitur’s songwriting and production credits are splashed all over recent big albums by popular music’s great and good, including Seal, Corinne Bailey Rae, Italian superstar Mina and Nolwenn Leroy.
On this, his fifth solo album, Teitur once again demonstrates why his work has attracted such widespread industry attention and avid critical acclaim.
Features collaborations with Nico Muhly (Anthony and the Johnsons, Grizzly Bear, Bjork) and the legendary Van Dyke Parks.

FLAC | 208 MB | UL | TB

ALLAllen Toussaint experienced a late-career revival sparked, ironically enough, by the devastation of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. He had to leave his hometown New Orleans after the hurricane, relocating to New York City where he started to play regular gigs at Joe’s Pub and, soon enough, he cut The River in Reverse with Elvis Costello. That 2006 album propelled Toussaint toward a greater audience, leading to more headlining concerts, two of which are chronicled on Rounder’s 2013 release Songbook. Recorded in 2009 at Joe’s Pub, Songbook features nothing more than Toussaint alone at a piano running through songs he’s written over the decades. He sprinkles in a New Orleans standard here and there — there’s an excellent rendition of “St. James Infirmary” — but the spotlight is on his peerless originals, songs that are standards in their own right: “Lipstick Traces (On a Cigarette),” “Holy Cow,” “Get Out of My Life, Woman,” “Yes We Can,” a medley of “A Certain Girl/Mother-in-Law/Fortune Teller,” “Southern Nights.” Toussaint’s voice sounds smooth and silky — he in no way seems as if he’s in his seventies — and his piano is similarly nimble as it glides from signature New Orleans stride and boogie to sophisticated, elegiac chords. Perhaps this album packs no revelations — there are no rearrangements, nothing unexpected in the songs — but as an elegant summation of strengths, this Songbook is mighty attractive.

mp3 256 kbps | 101 MB | UL | TB | CL

dwDisc 1 :
1. The Sad Side of Town
2. Late Great Golden State
3. The Back of Your Hand
4. If Teardrops Were Diamonds
5. Long Goodbye
6. Intentional Heartache
7. Blame the Vain
8. I Wanna Love Again
9. Just Passin’ Time
10. Crazy Little Thing Called Love
11. Close Up the Honky Tonks
12. My Heart Skips a Beat
13. Act Naturally
14. A Heart Like Mine

Disc 2:
1. Intentional Heartache
2. Blame the Vain
3. The Back of Your Hand
4. The Late Great Golden State
5. Close Up the Honky Tonks

mp3 VBR~245 kbps | 91 MB  | UL | CL

royRoy Harper’s first album in 13 years is an absolute corker on which he runs the gamut from cutting protest songs (Cloud Cuckooland, which lays into vacuous celebs and bankers) and sweet balladry (January Man) to mystical folk odysseys (the 23-minute suite Heaven Is Here and The Exile, nearly the equal of The Same Old Rock from Stormcock). I particularly like The Stranger, which finds him staring into the mirror at “some old ghost”, and the way the initially wistful Time Is Temporary heads off into a bluesy jam with a banjo. The album boasts arresting string arrangements throughout which could almost have been done by the late Robert Kirby, and the fluid electric guitar and booming fretless bass on the last track are gorgeous. Seventy-two not out: a great record.

mp3 192 kbps | 73 MB | UL | CL

DDavid Gibb and Elly Lucas, a youthful duo from Derbyshire, may be known to some as finalists of the BBC Young Folk Awards 2011. Having put out an EP in early 2011, and debut album “Old Chairs To Mend” through Hairpin records just last year, this is an act that is clearly not wasting time in getting out new material. With David on guitar, melodeon and vocals, and Elly on fiddle, viola and vocals too, the duo build an impressive sound, guesting other players throughout the album.
The album opens as it means to go on, with real drive and purpose behind the music. “Jackwire”, the first single from “Up Through The Woods” leaps and bounds through accomplished rhythmical guitar, executed to a tee, and delectable fiddle rolls – it opens the album in roaring fashion, an anthem seemingly against the machines taking the trades of their ancestors.
As it progresses, the album is a joy to listen to – the delicate ‘The Way Through The Woods’ is peaceful and precious, ‘Dalmation Cradle Song‘ is simply a study in harmonies and elegance of the voice and songwriting itself. ‘England’s Skies’ is so fantastically inherently English, as soon as the exquisitely performed fiddle roll comes in you are simply sat in your favourite pub having one of those merry ale fueled evenings with friends. However, Gibb and Lucas are so much more than another pub folk act. No better is this demonstrated than in the simply brilliant ‘Waterloo Johnny’, with echoes of Dylan (not just because of that storming mouth organ throughout) as much of as traditional folk, the duo are forging a fiercely strong album. It is undeniably spectacular.

mp3 320 kbps | 86 MB | UL | CL | TB

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