August 15, 2013 - It Rock And Roll
 

Day: August 15, 2013

dirtIt’s been almost two years since Detroit’s finest garage rockers the Dirtbombs have graced us with a new album– their last effort being 2011′s triple LP Party Store on In The Red Records. There’s rumor of a new album all recorded and mastered just waiting to get shipped off to the pressing plant, but we don’t have to wait anymore for our next fix of Mick Collins and Co’s soulful brand of garage punk. Cass Records has stepped in and pressed up our next dose of Dirtbombs, in the form of the singles comp Consistency Is The Enemy.
Consistency is the vinyl companion to their In The Red released career stretching singles, live and unreleased tracks collection If You Don’t Already Have A Look, released way way back in 2005. The double CD cataloged all those rare and expensive singles that the Dirtbombs are known for releasing at a high octane and prolific pace–last count they’ve released over thirty 7 inches! Sadly at the time, In The Red didn’t think a double or triple LP was financially worthwhile or more than likely that all the rabid Dirtbombs fans had most of the singles already. But seeing that they’re one of the last bands standing from the initial garage rock explosion of the 90s/early00s, steadily releasing more albums and gaining new fans, these singles needed to be re-released into the world on vinyl.

mp3 320 kbps | 104 MB | UL | CL

vaJohnny Vincent founded Ace Records in 1955 after being laid off from his job as an A&R man at Specialty Records — he had also founded Champion Records earlier in the decade — and although he based his operations in Jackson, Mississippi, he was also very much in tune with the New Orleans R&B and blues scene, signing and releasing singles by several Crescent City artists, including Huey “Piano” Smith & the Clowns (“Rockin’ Pneumonia and the Boogie Woogie Flu”), Frankie Ford (“Sea Cruise”), and Jimmy Clanton (“Venus in Blue Jeans”). But Vincent had several Mississippi blues artists on his roster, too, including Arthur Crudup, Sam Myers, King Edward, Pat Brown, and Willie Clayton, among others, and Ace became one of Mississippi’s most successful labels in the ’50s and ’60s. This two-disc, 36-track set collects some of these rare blues cuts, including ten sides that are making their first appearance on CD.

mp3 320 kbps | 221 MB | UL | TB

jeffThat guitarist Jeff Golub was able to record Train Keeps A Rolling at all is something of a miracle. In 2011, the optic nerves in the guitarist’s eyes mysteriously and inexplicably collapsed, leaving him blind and in need of a guard dog. In September of 2012, while trying to catch the subway in New York, Golub fell onto the tracks as a train was approaching. He was clipped and dragged for a distance, but amazingly, other than cuts and bruises, he was unhurt. This makes the occasion of his 12th studio offering a special one. To mark it, his longtime co-producer Bud Harner suggested that he collaborate with one of his personal heroes, British keyboard giant Brian Auger. They enlisted drummer Steve Ferrone from Auger’s Oblivion Express and bassist Derek Frank, who had also worked with the keyboardist. Various tracks are augmented by guests, including a four-piece horn section, percussionist Luis Conte, and vocalists Christopher Cross, Ambrosia’s David Pack, and Alex Ligertwood (former Oblivion Express and Santana frontman). The program opens with a bright, funky reading of Lalo Schifrin’s “The Cat” that accents the intuitive interplay between the B-3 and Golub’s guitar playing. There are three Auger compositions too, including a new reading of the slinky jazz-rock nugget “Happiness Is Just Around the Bend” with Ligertwood reprising his Oblivion Express vocal role. More outstanding are the punchy, horn-drenched funk of “Shepherds Bush Market,” which Auger wrote specifically for the date, and the previously unissued “Isola Natale,” with its jazzy Latin groove. Pop rears its head in a sophisticated read of Paul Carrack’s “How Long,” beautifully sung by Cross, and ramped up soul-jazz appears in an instrumental take on Curtis Mayfield’s iconic “Pusherman,” with a terrific horn chart and a monster B-3 solo. Golub shines throughout, but particularly on the ironically dubbed title track, which commences as a frenetic tropical salsa before giving way to steamy, Latin-fused jazz-rock. The only weak spots here are in the workmanlike version of the Police’s “Walking on the Moon” and the Mose Allison-influenced read of Willie Dixon’s “I Love the Life I Live”; both could have been left off without consequence. By and large, however, Train Keeps A Rolling is proof positive that you can’t keep a great musician down; it is inspired, kinetic, and chock-full of fine playing and arranging.

mp3 192 kbps | 69 MB | UL | CL

It Rock And Roll ©2017. All Rights Reserved.