May 2013 - It Rock And Roll
 

Month: May 2013

TRFats Domino’s decision to stay in his home in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward during Hurricane Katrina nearly cost him his life. The home was flooded and sustained major damage and the rock & roll pioneer had to be airlifted by helicopter from his roof. Age 77 when the storm hit, Domino was no longer performing as often as he once did, but he emerged proud and resolute and even recorded a new album, whose proceeds he donated to an organization aiding musicians hurt by the disaster. Just how loved Fats Domino is by the music community is borne out by the A-list names who’ve contributed to one of the more remarkable tribute albums to surface in recent years. Spanning the worlds of rock (Neil Young, Elton John, Los Lobos, Tom Petty), blues (B.B. King), country (Willie Nelson), jazz (Herbie Hancock), and even reggae (Toots & the Maytals, who just nail “Let the Four Winds Blow”), 30 artists are represented on the two discs, along with — of course — a healthy sampling of New Orleans artists of various grooves, among them Irma Thomas, Dr. John, Art Neville, and others. It’s a celebratory affair, for sure, and it would have to be, as Domino’s music has always tilted toward the upbeat, and you can bet he wouldn’t want it any other way. The project gets moving with one pulled up from the past, no less than the late John Lennon, who cut Fats’ “Ain’t That a Shame” for his 1975 Rock ‘n’ Roll album. Lennon’s former bandmate Paul McCartney teams up with NOLA mainstay Allen Toussaint for a duet on the jaunty “I Want to Walk You Home,” one of a number of inspired pairings of seemingly mismatched artists who find common ground in the Fat Man. Both Joss Stone and Buddy Guy hook up with the Dirty Dozen Brass Band for an electric “Every Night About This Time,” Ben Harper meets the Skatalites for — what else? — a zippy ska version of “Be My Guest,” and, in one of the album’s most surprising and satisfying moments, Robert Plant and the Soweto Gospel Choir collaborate on a stunning and haunting a cappella “Valley of Tears.” Of the individual performers, Randy Newman presents “Blue Monday” faithfully, Norah Jones applies her signature quasi-jazzy style to “My Blue Heaven,” and Corinne Bailey Rae’s live “One Night of Sin” — penned by Domino’s writing partner Dave Bartholomew, as are so many of these classics — returns to the song the danger removed by Elvis Presley when he cut a cleaned-up version and had a smash hit with it. There really are no clunkers here — these artists have done Fats Domino proud. And it’s a blessed thing that he stuck around to hear it.

mp3 VBR~187 kbps | 137 MB | UL

dNEW 2-CD “Rootsy Approved” set of new and retrospective David Olney music. CD #1 features “PREDICTING THE PAST” – an album of 16 new songs produced by Mr. Paul Burch (a notable performing artist and songwriter, himself) and features Grammy-award winner Dennis Crouch, Jen Gunderman, Fats Kaplin and Mr. Sergio Webb, among others. CD #2 includes a retrospective of songs released from 2000-2012.

mp3 256 kbps | 243 MB | UL  | CL | TB

PDónal Lunny (Planxty, The Bothy Band, Moving Hearts, Coolfin etc) teams up with Irish musics biggest young star Pádraig Rynne on concertinas and Breton flautist Sylvain Barou for a groundbreaking album.The material used on this album is a mix between old and newly written music by the trio as well as Eastern, sweedish and Breton pieces.

mp3 320 kbps | 104 MB | UL

leroi-bros-check1The LeRoi Brothers are the quintessential Texas roadhouse band, playing backseat, backbeat-driven rhythm and blues, rockabilly and blue-collar rock’n’roll with the grit, grease and power.The Leroi Brothers are somehow overlooked while jokers like Bryan Seltzer hog the limelight.  Rock & Roll had its day in the sun. Despite the weed like growth of retro this, retro that and retro everything, it’s still as hard to find good Rock and Roll as it is to find good jazz or blues–if not harder.

mp3 VBR~199 kbps | 48 MB | UL

naWith an intuitive understanding of melody and dynamics, Nancy Elizabeth brings a refreshingly Northern turn of phrase to her debut album, Battle and Victory.
The Lancashire-born singer’s down-to-earth songs are brought to life by her warm and unaffected voice. Unpretentious but effortlessly ambitious, Nancy turns the retro, less-is-more aesthetic of the current acoustic revival on its head. Not content with writing and singing all the songs herself, the 23 year-old also plays most of the instruments, including guitar, khim, Indian harmonium, Appalachian dulcimer and bouzouki, amongst many others.
Prominently featured is a 22-string Celtic harp, which she first picked up a little over two years ago, after an inspirational chance meeting with a harp player at a Liverpool gallery. Not long afterwards she received a modest award from a music foundation, and within days had spent it all on the perfect instrument, which has become a cornerstone of her performances.
The album was recorded in a 17th Century white stone cottage in the remote Welsh countryside, and a village hall outside Manchester, resulting in an intimate, uncontrived gem of a record. Using a minimum of recording equipment, the heartfelt honesty of her songs is revealed, extending to grander, more complex arrangements when the occasion calls, and bringing in friends to add cello, horns and percussion. While her work is never in thrall to any particular artist or genre, Nancy’s music calls to mind aspects of artists as diverse as Nina Nastasia, The Incredible String Band, Radiohead, Jacqui McShee, Mogwai, Talk Talk and Led Zeppelin.

mp3 VBR~223 kbps | 74 MB | UL

kieran kane & kevin welch - 11-12-13 live from melbourne - front (from glitterhouse)These are live recordings from Kane’s joint appearances with fellow country-folk songwriter (and fellow Dead Reckoning artist) Kevin Welch in Melbourne, Australia, on November 12 and November 13 of 1999. For these shows, the pair played unaccompanied, using just a bass and a guitar. Sometimes harmonizing, sometimes letting one or the other sing solo, they ran through 15 songs, mostly original material composed by Kane and Welch separately, although there are covers of John Hiatt’s “Train to Birmingham” and Hank Williams’ “Ramblin’ Man.” There’s an informal, playing-before-friends feel to the performances, on tunes that are mostly good-natured and easygoing, even if songs like Kane’s “Table Top Dancer” get into something a little darker. Low-key country-folk, suited for Sunday morning tea.

mp3 VBR~157 kbps | 63 MB | UL

WHAfter listening to this multi-artist two-CD celebration of Pete Seeger’s songs, you’ll be delighted to read in the liner notes that it’s “just the beginning of at least four volumes.” Producer Jim Musselman calls the package a “labor of love,” and that’s clearly what it was. Musselman did a terrific job of choosing the songs from Seeger’s vast repertoire, and of matching each tune with an artist “based on either the philosophical fit between the artist and the message of the song and/or their unique musical style.” Even the extensive liner notes — which include info on each performer, plus comments on every song by Seeger and the performer — testify to the effort that went into the project. The result is one of the most consistently successful tribute albums on the market.
The material is wonderful; whether you think of Seeger primarily as an interpreter or a crusader for social justice, you’ll be impressed by this reminder of just how many classic tunes he has written or cowritten and how many topics he’s covered — everything from the Byrds-popularized “Turn, Turn, Turn” (Bruce Cockburn) to the lullaby “One Grain of Sand” (Odetta) to “Kisses Sweeter than Wine” (Jackson Browne and Bonnie Raitt).
The performers, who range in age from five to 85, are a motley crew; and while they include more than a few obscure artists who apparently made the grade because they happen to be signed to Appleseed or its affiliated labels, the collection also features lots of big names. More importantly, nearly all of the 39 recordings are first-rate. Among the many highlights: Bruce Springsteen’s gentle reading of “We Shall Overcome”; Greg Brown’s “Sailing Down My Golden River”; Roger McGuinn’s “Bells of Rhymney” (a song he first recorded with the Byrds); and Ani DiFranco’s “My Name Is Lisa Kalvelage.”
Perhaps most touching, though, is the concluding number, Pete Seeger’s own recording of his newly written “And Still I Am Searching.” Sadly, the track does back up Seeger’s statement in the liner notes that “I hardly have any voice left.” But it also evidences the spirit that gave birth to all these songs. That spirit was still very much alive in the septuagenarian Seeger when this album was released, and thanks to his music, it will be around long after he’s gone.

mp3 160 kbps | 173 MB | UL | TB

diDivine Horsemen were a punk/roots band founded in 1983 by Chris D. (Desjardins), formerly of L.A. punk rock band The Flesh Eaters.The band developed a distinctive (and at the time, very new) alt country- type sound. They took their name from a voodoo term; a worshiper who is possessed by loa during a ceremony is said to be being ridden by The Divine Horsemen. The term was also used as a song title by The Flesh Eaters.Other band members included Julie Christensen (Chris’ then-wife), Matt Lee and Peter Andrus, as well as Flesh Eaters stalwart Robyn Jameson. They were joined at times by members of L.A. punk bands like Kid Congo Powers of The Gun Club and The Cramps, Jeffrey Lee Pierce of The Gun Club. They broke up in 1988.

mp3 VBR~198 kbps | 60 MB | UL

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Creating his cleanest and most modern record yet, Sonny Smith again creates a consistently great record in yet another new direction with Antenna To The Afterworld.

Tracks:

1. Dark Corners
2. Mutilator
3. Palmreader
4. Path Of Orbit
5. Natural Acts
6. Girl On The Street
7. Death Scene
8. Primitive
9. Void
10. Earth Girl
11. Green Blood

mp3 320 kbps | 82 MB | UL | CL

jaIn 1981, as the legend goes, Jason Ringenberg left his daddy’s Illinois hog farm for the bright lights of Nashville and promptly stumbled upon guitarist Warner Hodges and bassist Jeff Johnson in a gutter. With drummer Perry Baggs, they became Jason and the Nashville Scorchers. The original Reckless Country Soul — a Hank Williams classic, a Jimmie Rodgers number and a pair of originals, all recorded live to 4-track and issued on a modest 7-inch by a local independent label — was clearly a formative work. The reissue — augmented by a leftover from the band’s first session, five outtakes from studio time later in ’82 and an unlisted bonus — is an entertaining snapshot of the boys rooting around for a style to call their own. In a wild and randy cover of Carl Perkins’ “Gone Gone Gone” and the ripsnorting medley of Kostas’ “I’d Rather Die Young” and George Morgan’s “Candy Kisses,” they stumble right into it.

mp3 320 kbps | 69 MB | UL

CHTracks:

01. Country by the Grace of God
02. My Love Goes On and On
03. What A Beautiful Day
04. I Breathe In, I Breathe Out
05. Miss Me Baby
06. Wal-Mart Parking Lot
07. Laredo
08. What Kinda Gone
09. No Love Songs
10. My Life’s Been A Country Song
11. Chicks Dig It

mp3 320 kbps | 81 MB | UL | CL

DUNThe Dunwells are a British folk rock band formed in Leeds, Yorkshire, England in 2009. The group consists of Joseph Dunwell (vocals, guitar), David Dunwell (vocals, guitars, piano, banjo), Jonny Lamb (vocals, drums), Rob Clayton (bass, vocals), and Dave Hanson (lead guitar, vocals, pedal steel).

mp3 320 kbps | 102 MB | UL | CL

juTracks:

01. Old Man Town
02. Naked Woman
03. Cursed Waltz
04. Silent Man
05. Revert to the Wild
06. Interlude de Suzanne
07. Billy
08. Clap Your Hands
09. Yellow Leaves
10. Near the Stars
11. No More
12. Flying Hat
13. Final de Suzanne
14. The Moon Who Talked to the Wind (Ode to Delphine)

mp3 320 kbps | 103 MB | UL | CL

EMAHill’s honey-smoked voice takes on a soulful growl in many of the numbers, and combined with the horns that periodically kick in to accompany the familiar guitar, banjo and pedal steel, it imparts a bit of a New Orleans vibe to many of the songs. There is still plenty of rootsy sensibility to Emma Hill’s music, but it is tinged with a soupcon of jazz.From the sultry swing of Crushin’ to the sweet sadness of The Arrow is Sharp, from the affectionate playfulness of Fallin’ For a Girl to the aching lilting cry of A Hundred Homes, Emma Hill shows a maturation that sees her stretching her wings into new musical territory. The Black and Wretched Blue is a nicely nuanced album, full of heartache and joy, that satisfies on many levels.

mp3 VBR~231 kbps | 74 MB | UL | CL

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