January 2013 - Page 2 of 10 - It Rock And Roll
 

Month: January 2013

adAdam Green & Binki Shapiro are technically a supergroup – he’s one half of Mouldy Peaches, she’s one third of Little Joy – and they’ve recorded a record of cutesy psychedellia that reaches out to anyone at romantic rock bottom. Sure, all music is lovesick but these ten tracks are laced with more schadenfreude than Aidan Moffat’s divorce proceedings.Green and Shapiro’s hippy guitar sound gels perfectly with their lyrics that snipe at couples caught in freefall. It’s like an angrier, updated Nancy & Lee, with ‘Casanova’ taking a hazy country tune and letting Shapiro sing over it like she’s defending herself on a stalking charge (”Don’t want the wrong person holding me/Why are you always finding/New ways of wasting my time/Why are you always hiding/Am I not supposed to look you in the eye”). The self-hate clashes so comically with the music it’s like listening to a Flight of the Conchords track, the psychedelic harmonies and surf rock guitar adding a cosy but warped little touch.

mp3 256 kbps | 59 MB | UL

biFor the follow up to their 2010 White Hat, Chris Senseney and Stefanie Drootin-Senseney, the husband and wife duo known as Big Harp, had two choices: pursue the rough and rural acoustic edges of their studio debut or delve further into the more raw, electric charge that accompanied their live shows. Chain Letters, the pair’s January 22 album on Saddle Creek, clearly indicates they went with Option B. “We were sitting around in a bedroom playing really loud with no drums, just kind of trusting that it was going to make sense once we put it all together” says Chris. “Hopefully we landed closer to mid-’70’s Iggy Pop than Leonard Cohen this time.” The Senseney’s may not have fully achieved their dream sound of “Cohen fronting The Pixies” — the mellow folk heart of songs like “Bar All The Doors” surfaces now and then — but the freewheeling Chain Letters is shot through with grit and tension, Stefanie’s prominent fuzz bass lines and Chris’ loose-limbed baritone driving tracks like the ragged, wall-of-sound epic “You Can’t Save ’em All”.

mp3 160 kbps | 43 MB | UL

johnThe Bursting Sheaf is the 4th album by Portland singer-songwriter John Amadon. The follow up to his critically acclaimed 2011 release Seven Stars, with the Bursting Sheaf Amadon gives listeners yet more of the exquisite pop craftsmanship, lyrical ingenuity, and musical prowess they have come to expect from him.

Recommended if You Like:

Big Star
George Harrison
Wilco

mp3 320 kbps | 101 MB | UL

hearts of oak hoesLife seems to be playing out more like a sappy country song these days. Since back from TX, there’s hardly been a day without a new verse… Despite that, trying to get back to more regular posts. And listening to this a lot lately. “Used To It Now,” the second album from Portland, Oregon’s Hearts Of Oak which is Nate Wallace and friends. Hearts of Oak is a hidden gem for anyone who likes genuine country music and americana. This album has some incredibly impressive songwriting and immediately makes you feel like you are listening to early Bob Dylan, Neil Young or Steve Earle. If you are a fan of songwriters like Ryan Bingham or John Prine you will love Hearts of Oak.

mp3 192 kbps | 63 MB | UL

slaThe Slaughterhouse Chorus is a blend of twangy, down-home hillbilly rock infused with a heavy dose of punk and a tinge of folk. (Not exactly what you’d expect from a band hailing from New York City.) If the Supersuckers fucked Larry And His Flask, or vice versa,The Slaughterhouse Chorus would be their illegitimate love child.
The band’s inaugural self-tilted EP is a 13-track hell-bound hayride through the heart of America via the streets of The Great Apple; and is just as unpredictable. The album sways seamlessly, yet purposefully, like “Amber Waves of Cocaine”, the opening track (which sets the stage for the ensuing managed mayhem). The following three songs, “A Month Without”, “Built for BBQ” and “Let’s Get Invisible” exude more country-esque qualities than punk, but “For God and Country” rekindles the rock ‘n’ roll fervor. “The Full Nelson” is nothing more than pure, unadulterated rock, replete with ample baby-makin’ guitar solos; which ironically segues into a grab-your-partner swing-type instrumental affectionately dubbed “All My Mistakes are Your Fault Tonight”.

mp3 128 kbps | 37 MB | UL

FRONT

Americana under the influence of Jump Blues, Swing, & Rockabilly…Ba – ba – ba – Boogie! With a dab of N’awlins for extra spice! Smoke & honey vocals, Cigar Box Guitar, Upright Bass, Banjo, Washboard…servin’ up high energy & deep vintage vibes is our specialty.
Recommended if You Like:
Imelda May
Southern Culture On The Skids
Squirrel Nut Zippers
mp3 128 kbps | 45 MB | UL

rockGuitarist Joe Bonamassa has added yet another side project to his already busy life. In addition to his amazingly successful solo career, Joe is the lead guitarist and part time vocalist for Black Country Communion, has done an album with vocalist Beth Hart and now, he has a funk band titled Rock Candy Funk Party.
The album, a slight nod to the Miles Davis album, We Want Miles, is a lesson in purity. These guys are not reinventing the funk wagon at all, quite the opposite. They are paying homage to a genre that has been all but forgotten in the American musical consciousness. They do it with mostly original music, one track, “Root Down (and Get It)” is a remake, the rest are original. Granted, funky rock candy party music is not for everyone. Still, this is good stuff for when you’re in that certain mood…you know when you need to get your groove on and you want to get funky. When that mood hits then this one will do the trick time and time again.

mp3 + Covers | 193 MB | UL | CL

TOAll songs written, recorded, performed and produced by Tony Gwynne, with the exception of ‘Rain Down on Me’ co-written with Sadie Fleming and ‘The Arrival of the Season’ co-written with Miles Biddulph and Iain Archer (Snow Patrol) Produced by Miles Biddulph. ‘Mystery to Me’ co-written with Mark Chappell.

Piano, Guitar, Bass, Vocals – Tony Gwynne
Backing Vocals – Tony Gwynne/Heidi Berry/Miles Biddulph
Strings – Tony Gwynne/Sadie Fleming/Craig Thomas
Drums – Josh Clark

mp3 VBR-220 kbps |60 MB | UL

jimboNew album from the singer/songwriter (best known for his work with Squirrel Nut Zippers). The late Memphis producer Jim Dickinson once called Jimbo Mathus ”the singing voice of Huck Finn.” Outside the South, Mathus is likely known as the ringleader of the hyper-ragtime outfit Squirrel Nut Zippers. In his native Mississippi and throughout the South, however, Mathus is the prolific songwriter of born-in-the-bone Southern music, the torchbearer for Deep South mythology and culture. Think Delta highways, bowling-pin Budweisers and ‘innerplanetary honky-tonk’ for the masses.

mp3 160 kbps | 40 MB | UL

REDRed Stick Ramblers deliver an eclectic mix of Zydeco, Country, Bluegrass and Swing. They also deliver a shindig that is a festive Jamboree whether it is in Cajun country or anywhere else in the country for that matter. Their new album My Suitcase is Always Packed was releasedon Sugar Hill Records, and it is a perfect example of the diversity of influences that dwell in the collective soul of this band.The album is aptly named as it takes the listener on a road trip of Honky Tonks, Cajun dances and Southern countryside. Along the way they find love and lose it and they get happy and get the blues. The Ramblers are accomplished musicians. In fact, Linzay Young, better known for his smooth vocal styling, has been nominated for fiddler of the year by Offbeat Magazine and he may not be the best fiddler in the band. In the end on the final song of the journey, “The Barnyard Bachelor” the Ramblers give us the moral of the story, “There is only room in the barnyard for just one rooster and that means no chicks for you.”

mp3 320 kbps | 105 MB | UL

jenny Alberta Rose, to be released by Randale Records in 2011, is Jenny’s first full-length album. True to Jenny’s original vision, it blends traditional Canadian folk music with the strength and power of good old fashioned oi!. While the album is definitely influenced by bands in both genres, it is truly unlike any album that has been cut before. As a result, Alberta Rose undoubtedly carves out a new sub-genre of oi! and hails the new dawn for distinctive and expressive skinhead music.

mp3 256 kbps | 69 MB | UL

FIVEThe blues means many things to many people. To some, the purists, it is the scratchy honesty of Robert Johnson with his devil-fueled fretwork. To others, it is the rock n roll that he influenced, be it Cream, The Stones, or early Fleetwood Mac. When Five Horse Johnson formed back in 1995, referring to itself as a blues band, a few brows might well have been furrowed. However, this is a band that has always understood that the blues isn t a formula, but a way of looking at the world; their take on the blues is a dirty, sensual thing enhanced with a healthy dose of humor. FHJ is now 17 years and six albums into its career, with a seventh about to drop. The band has dug a niche of its own, combining a love and respect for traditional blues and classic rock to become one of the most loved and respected bands in the stoner rock community.Released in January 2013, The Taking of Black Heart literally sees retro-rock survivors Five Horse Johnson “galloping” back into action — or at least that’s the rhythmic feel of the album’s opening number, “The Job,” the image gracing its cover art, etc. Given all they’ve been through (none of it more traumatizing than frontman Eric Oblander suffering a stroke!), few would expect the group to come riding in to rescue classic rock from a fate worse than death (irrelevance), especially some six years removed from their last long-player’s release. But as song after song rolls by, oftentimes driven by bluesier and rootsier songwriting ethics than 5HJ’s ever displayed before, hope does spring eternal — amen, bruvvers and sistahs, alright. Wailing harmonica and slippery slide guitars wrap themselves round and round laid-back groovers (“Keep on Diggin’,” “Smash & Grab,” “Die in the River”) and foot-stomping bruisers alike (“Black Heart Baby,” “Shoot My Way Out”), thereby luring patrons left and right into 5HJ’s juke joint — and the first shot of canned heat is on them. Heck, and if any additional credibility were needed, get a load of Cheap Trick’s Robin Zander taking over the mike stand for the album’s funkiest, most euphoric moment in “You’re My Girl” — Otis Redding surely would approve. Perhaps more than any other track, the latter also highlights Five Horse Johnson’s enduring faith and pure joy in playing rock & roll, regardless of how many paying customers show up on any given night. They’re a band’s band, at the end of the day: playing to play — and The Taking of Black Heart is therefore a welcome return, bringing good news to the rock & roll faithful everywhere.

mp3 160 kbps | 54 MB | UL

bexStrong vocals and seriously good musicianship inhabit The House of Mercy from the first track to the last. It’s a combination of up-tempo blues and Americana, with a toe or two dipped into the world of gospel.There’s a pretty impressive line-up of musicians on this album with Bex. Legendary dobro master BJ Cole, Jake the Bass from Hayseed Dixie (worked with them last year at Cropredy festival and they were monster good,)The Reno Brothers (Don Wayne and Dale), harmonica maestro Steve Lockwood, fiddle queen Eileen Healy, Nashville blues artist Brigitte De Meyer, gospel singer Shola Adegoraye, keyboard man Toby Baker, bassists Barry Payne, Jake Byers (of Hayseed Dixie) and Gary Choules, perussionist Danny Bryan, drummer Crispin Taylor, banjo man Don Wayne and a certain Barry Marshall-Everitt pops up on harmonica – he of The House of Mercy radio show and Bex’s husband.

mp3 320 kbps | 103 MB | UL

bedSydney’s Bed Wettin’ Bad Boys are definitely a rock band, and listening to Ready For Boredom, there’s no disputing they’ve heard a lot of it.These guys have gotten better and better since they first started pushing their gear to shows in shopping trolleys a few years ago. It’s well played, heartfelt and smart. A mix of stuff like the Replacements, Faces, Husker Du, Thin Lizzy can be heard but they cross it with a charming awkwardness and worrying about their future a lot.

mp3 320 kbps | 81 MB | UL

whWhiskey Shivers sounds as if it just emerged from deep in the woods – barefoot, loud, and with little sense of propriety.
Even with proper introduction, live or from the band’s two CDs, you might think the same, only these locals are blazing a path through Downtown streets to the country-fried heart of Austin.Rampa Head, quick turnaround to 2011′s Batholith, is a lightning-fast trip down dirt roads, opener Way Downtown a banjo-plucked cautionary anthem originally by Doc Watson concerning the trouble one can find in city centers. Whiskey Shivers has a lot to say about the freewheeling, trouble-free lifestyle.

mp3 320 kbps | 94 MB | UL | CL

SENThe Sensitive Drunks ,indie group have put out something that sounds like a hybrid of The Beach Boys, Arctic Monkeys, and a touch of Two Door Cinema Club.Such a band is the Sensitive Drunks out of Perth, West Australia who admit their brief was the songs should be fun and catchy, they should not take themselves too seriously “and we should be able to perform them live with at least half a dozen pints in our beliies”.

mp3 128 kbps | 85 MB | UL

aaMy True Story started out as Aaron Neville’s “doo-wop project” but became something else. On a promotional video made for the album, Blue Note label president and album co-producer Don Was tells part of the story. He gathered a list of about 100 possible tunes to record, went over them with Neville and selected the top 12. Then he gave Keith Richards a ring and asked if Richards would like to co-produce, play guitar and lead the band.But that’s exactly where the project jumped the tracks, or as Was explains it, “I [first] heard it as a collection of ballads, and somehow, we just went off list … Aaron started improvising [the song selection], and it became almost stream-of-consciousness, it kind of took a rock ’n’ roll turn I think.” From the artist’s point of view, it simply became an Aaron Neville album, maybe the first real Aaron Neville album he’s ever made, because this time around, nothing but the music mattered, and the music coming from Neville’s head, from his heart and more importantly, from his soul. “I think this music has been ridin’ on my heart for all these years, that’s why I try to put a little bit of it in everything I do,” Neville says. “But this time, I wanted to respect the music, I didn’t go too far away from the original, I just wanted to put a little bit of my own inflections in it, what comes from my heart.”My True Story has become, in fact, Aaron Neville’s true story, the first of what he hopes will be a series of albums done exactly the same way (Neville says another batch of tunes from the My True Story sessions is cut and ready to go). This time around there are a dozen songs, chosen from material that spans a dozen years—from 1952 to 1964—and features, at its apex, the Ronettes/Phil Spector masterpiece “Be My Baby,” followed by Clyde McPhatter’s “Little Bitty Pretty One,” Little Anthony and The Imperials’ “Tears on My Pillow” and The Drifters’ “Under the Boardwalk.” There are also unexpected ringers thrown in, such as Curtis Mayfield’s “Gypsy Woman” and “Ruby, Baby”—done first by The Drifters, then Dion and the Belmonts and again, much later, by Steely Dan co-founder Donald Fagen on his 1982 solo album The Nightfly. Also present: a couple of expected, gorgeous ballads, including “This Magic Moment” and “Goodnight, My Love.”What there isn’t is a drop of sentimentality. Neville keeps his promise to reign in his trademark flourishes and vocal acrobatics. Every arrangement serves every song perfectly, and the effect is less what we’ve come to expect from an Aaron Neville album and more like a group effort that reminds us how good these songs are, played straight, a half century after they were first written.On the songs’ universality, Neville recalls how Paul Simon dropped by the sessions and all three musicians—Neville, Simon and Richards—carried on a musical conversation “like we all grew up on the same block.” As for their quality, Neville believes the music from this era is worthy of an addendum to The Great American Songbook. I second that emotion.   by Roger Hahn

mp3 320 kbps  + Covers | 95 MB | UL

kanSleeper is the title of the most recent album by Kan, a contemporary Celtic music band based in the UK. Kan features some of the finest musicians in the current Irish and Scottish roots music scene. The musicians describe their act as “a homogenous quartet of lead instruments.”The four musicians demonstrate admirable skill as instrumentalists and perform highly creative music. Kan composes original material that combines traditional music from Great Britain and Ireland with Asturian jigs from Spain, Breton dances from France and modern jazz elements. Although the interplay of flutes, whistles and fiddles are in the forefront, rhythm, specially drums, plays an essential role in Kan’s music with inspired drum kit work and expert tempo changes.

mp3 320 kbps | 111 MB | UL | CL

texRelease in December 2012, A Wayfarer’s Lament is a chapter on lifes beginnings, endings, and the hope that shines through it all. Uplifting honest songs that go deep. Simple arrangements create a beautifully sparse room of sound and soul. Featuring many of the same musicians as on Tex Smith, and To a Bird Singing Woe, A Wayfarer’s Lament follows the first two like Part 3 of a story. All original songs, written and produced in Austin Texas by Tex Smith along with Brother Machine. A great follow up to his first two records, you will want all 3.

mp3 160 kbps | 68 MB | UL

It Rock And Roll ©2017. All Rights Reserved.